Spring Fellow participates in symposium March 11-15 in San Diego; offers access to 2012 Kyoto Prize Laureates for Q&A on technology, science and arts

 

SAN DIEGO—December 12, 2012 — Point Loma Nazarene University (PLNU) is now accepting applications for the 2013 Kyoto Prize Symposium Journalism Fellowship, a program that provides an exceptional learning opportunity for journalists seeking to further their knowledge and depth of reporting in technology, science and the arts. The selected journalist will travel to San Diego in March 2013 where he or she will attend the annual Kyoto Prize Symposium, including March 12 opening events at PLNU and lectures by the latest Kyoto Prize laureates on March 13-14 at San Diego State University, University of California, San Diego and the University of San Diego.

During the program, the journalist will have opportunities to meet and interview the 2012 laureates of the Kyoto Prize, Japan’s highest private award for global achievement. The fellowship experience is intended to enhance the journalist’s ability to report on fields affected by the works of the latest laureates, to better understand the global impact of advances in each field, and to gain an historical context of the laureates’ work.

 

The application deadline is Friday, February 1, 2013.

The 2012 Kyoto Prize laureates are:

● In “Advanced Technology” ― Dr. Ivan Sutherland, 74, an American computer scientist and visiting scientist at Portland State University, is widely regarded as the “Father of Computer Graphics” for his lifetime of pioneering work in developing visual methods of interacting with computers. Dr. Sutherland gained early attention in 1963 by developing Sketchpad, a graphical interface program that established a paradigm for today’s computer-aided design (CAD) systems and numerous other computer graphic-based applications.  Sutherland is currently engaged in research of asynchronous computing.

● In “Basic Sciences” ― Dr. Yoshinori Ohsumi*, 67, a Japanese scientist, researcher and professor at the Frontier Research Center of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, has made groundbreaking contributions toward elucidating the molecular mechanisms and physiological significance of autophagy. Autophagy, the process by which a cell degrades its own proteins in order to adapt to nutritional deficiency and other influences, is now regarded as a vital cell-recycling system and may aid in future developments to treat neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, cancer and other age-related ailments.

● In “Arts and Philosophy” ― Professor Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak*, 70, an Indian intellectual, activist, and University Professor at Columbia University, exemplifies the modern intellectual through her theoretical work for the humanities based on comparative literature and her devotion to multifaceted educational activities, especially in developing regions. She is perhaps best known for her essay “Can the Subaltern Speak?,” which spotlights those who are economically dispossessed, forcibly marginalized and rendered without agency by their social status.

 

“The Kyoto Prize laureates are at the top of their fields in science, technology and arts and philosophy,” said Dr. Bob Brower, president, PNLU. “Beyond that, the Kyoto Prize recognizes the significance of their contributions to mankind. The fellowship gives journalists unique access to these laureates in the engaging, interactive setting of the Kyoto Prize Symposium.”

The fellowship is open to North American journalists and covers transportation, accommodations, and per-diem expenses. The selection committee, comprised of professional journalists and journalism professors, will announce the 2013 Spring Fellow on February 8.

Applications are available at www.pointloma.edu/kyotoprize.

The Kyoto Prize – an international award for lifetime achievement – is given to individuals and groups worldwide who have made outstanding contributions to humankind’s scientific, cultural and spiritual development. Each prize consists of a diploma, a 20-karat-gold Kyoto Prize medal, and a cash gift totaling 50 million yen (approximately US$630,000).

 

About Point Loma Nazarene University

Point Loma Nazarene University is a selective Christian liberal arts institution located in San Diego, California. Founded in 1902, PLNU is known not only for its 90-acre campus overlooking the Pacific Ocean but also for its well-rounded, forward-thinking graduates. In addition to more than 60 undergraduate areas of study, PLNU offers graduate program regional centers throughout Southern California. PLNU serves more than 3,500 students. The Kyoto Prize Journalism Fellowship is an equal-opportunity program awarded exclusively on the basis of merit without regard to personal or religious affiliations or attributes.

 

About the Inamori Foundation and the Kyoto Prize

The non-profit Inamori Foundation was established in 1984 by Dr. Kazuo Inamori, a Japanese entrepreneur and humanitarian. The Foundation created the Kyoto Prize in 1985, in line with Dr. Inamori’s belief that a human being has no higher calling than to strive for the greater good of society, and that the future of humanity can be assured only when there is a balance between our scientific progress and our spiritual depth. With the 2012 laureates, the prize has honored 90 individuals and one foundation — collectively representing 15 nations. Individual laureates range from scientists, engineers and researchers to philosophers, painters, architects, sculptors, musicians and film directors. The United States has produced the most recipients (36), followed by Japan (16), the United Kingdom (12), and France (8). More information can be found at www.kyotoprize.org/en/.

 

# # #

 

NOTE TO EDITORS:

* Dr. Yoshinori Ohsumi: Yo-shee-nor-ee Oh-soo-mee

* Professor Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak: Guy-ah-tree Chah-krah-vor-tee Spee-vahk

 

Media Contacts

Point Loma Nazarene University
Megan Ekard Collins, 619-849-2298
MeganEkardCollins@pointloma.edu
LPI Communications for the Kyoto Prize
Leasa Ireland, 310-750-7082
leasa@lpicommunications.com

KYOTO, JAPAN — June 22, 2012 — The Inamori Foundation today announced that Professor Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak*, 70, has been selected to receive the 28th annual Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy in the field of Thought and Ethics. Professor Spivak is an Indian intellectual, activist, and University Professor at Columbia University, the school’s highest honor for professors, where she is also a founder of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society. She exemplifies the modern intellectual through her theoretical work for the humanities based on comparative literature and her devotion to multifaceted educational activities, especially in developing regions.

 

The Work of Professor Spivak
A prolific author, Professor Spivak is perhaps best known for her 1988 essay “Can the Subaltern Speak?” In this article, she spotlights the “subalterns” — those who are economically dispossessed, forcibly marginalized and rendered without agency by their social status. She listens carefully to the subaltern voice and sounds a warning against its newly-formed identity made in the process of representation by others. Epitomizing her concept is the approach of “unlearning” — undermining one’s own privileged position and learning in the face of the geopolitical situation of knowledge. Her approach has strongly influenced the development of postcolonialism, which criticizes the politics, economy and culture of our global society — the very forces that were once envisioned to surmount the framework of nation states, but that have since instead come to function as a form of renewed colonialism in them.

Retaining her Indian citizenship, she lives and teaches in the U.S.A. and attends discussions and gatherings around the world. She also works to promote literacy in rural villages and to translate local literature from India and Bangladesh. Professor Spivak is committed to fulfilling what she regards as a profound and ethical responsibility toward minorities who have been deprived of language and history through an invisible structure of oppression, and her social work in this regard has earned her respect around the world.

Professor Spivak joins Dr. Ivan Sutherland (Advanced Technology) and Dr. Yoshinori Ohsumi (Basic Sciences) as this year’s honorees of the prestigious Kyoto Prize. Each laureate will receive a diploma, a 20-karat gold Kyoto Prize medal and a cash gift of 50 million yen (approximately US$630,000) in recognition of lifelong contributions to society at a ceremony in Kyoto, Japan on November 10, 2012.

About the Inamori Foundation and the Kyoto Prize
The non-profit Inamori Foundation was established in 1984 by Dr. Kazuo Inamori, founder and chairman emeritus of Kyocera Corporation, founder of and honorary adviser to KDDI Corporation, and director and chairman emeritus of Japan Airlines. The Foundation created the Kyoto Prize in 1985, in line with Dr. Inamori’s belief that a human being has no higher calling than to strive for the greater good of society, and that the future of humanity can be assured only when there is a balance between our scientific progress and our spiritual depth. With the 2012 laureates, the prize has honored 90 individuals and one foundation — collectively representing 15 nations. Individual laureates range from scientists, engineers and researchers to philosophers, painters, architects, sculptors, musicians and film directors. The United States has produced the most recipients (36), followed by Japan (16), the United Kingdom (12), and France (8).  More information can be found at www.kyotoprize.org/en/.

* Professor Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak: Guy-ah-tree, Chah-krah-vor-tee, Spee-vahk

 

# # #

Media Contacts:
The Inamori Foundation
Jay Scovie
+1-858-576-2674
jay.scovie@kyocera.com

LPI Communications
Leasa Ireland
+1-310-796-1936
+1-310- 750-7082
leasa@lpicommunications.com